Flos

New Goldman from Flos zooms straight into the LED desk lights Top 10!

Flos goldman desk light brass green  

Ron Gilad's Goldman for Flos is witty, practical and beautiful.

Witty, because it draws on the iconography of the classic bankers' light. So, from this...

classic bankers' desk light

...to this:

Flos Goldman desk light from filmPractical, because there is a good beam spread,  and your eyes are protected from glare by the green diffuser:

flos goldman desk light on old desk

And beautiful: well, that is thanks to an excellent designer, Ron Gilad, at the top of his game -- the dimensions, the curves, the lines, the proportions....

Green has been traditionally used in this context because it was deemed the colour most restful to the eyes. But if you would prefer more subdued finishes in these recessionary times, Flos also do a cool version in black chrome with a fumé diffuser:

flos goldman desk light in black nickel and fume by window

Instead of the chain traditionally used, there is an optical switch on the base, dimmable with "Soft Touch" technology -- so even the act of turning Goldman on and off is quietly satisfying.

And you don't only have to use it on your desk! Here is a couple of Goldmans lighting a display of expensive phones:

Goldman desk light from Flos with Virtu phonesBut this light is not itself expensive, though. For example, in the UK, Flos are only asking £303.13, inc. VAT!

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lightjunction: trend #3 -- modules that you can build up into compositions

vibia origami composition outdoors

lightjunction, our new fine lighting event, will be collocated with designjunction at the Sorting Office on New Oxford Street during London Design Week, 18-22 September 2013

A completely new type of light is creating exciting possibilities!

Each design is a module that, when connected to others, forms a spectacular installation that can cover wide areas.

You decide where they go, so the result is site-specific.

The leading source is Vibia, who are offering modules for use on walls and ceilings, indoors and out.

This is such an important development in decorative lighting that we have asked Vibia to give a half-hour training sessions on it at lightjunction.

To understand what is happening, let's look at their Origami -- the light featured in the image above.

There are just two shapes...

Vibia Origami wall light shapes

...out of which you can make compositions on a wall and/or ceiling. They connect together electrically, so you only need one power supply. Origami can be used inside or out-of-doors.

That's it really, because the rest is up to you!

Here are some arrangements that others have done:

Vibia origami wall light composition

vibia origami wall light composition exterior

vibia origami wall light composition

And here is a a video that briefly shows how it is done:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=-Tbvj2MyqtI

The video introduces you to Vibia's Create Your Project (CREA), a free, easy-to-use software tool that becomes more exciting the more you get to know it. We'll cover it more fully in another post but, for now, understand that Vibia were responding to the fact that, whilst the possibilities of these compositions are huge, we are all likely to need a bit of help composing them!

We want to play about with different configurations, then, when we are happy with our design, our clients need to see what we have done, so that they can approve it.

Therefore, CREA produces a 3D simulation, which can show much more than just the Vibia composition. This is why it becomes such a useful tool. You can produce professional-quality 3D visualizations of your proposals without having to involve anybody else!

It also produces a installation manual specific to your composition.

If CREA helps if you are using Origami, it is essential if you want to make up something magical using Vibia's  Match!  This module could not be used if it were not for CREA.

It starts simply enough:

vibia match pendant light composition

but pretty quickly it grows into this:

vibia match pendant light composition

The way CREA works for Match is that you tell it what area you want lit. It then works out where the light bodies need to be, and presents you with a variety of suitable arrangements from which you choose. It is certainly worth it for results like these:

vibia match pendant light installation

vibia match pendant light installation

Here's another helpful little video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=4zpZtOLHPsY

Match is just one of Vibia's pendant-type modules. Others are Ameba, Halo Circular, Halo Lineal and Rhythm. For the ceiling, there are Link XXL and Link. For the wall, besides Origami, there is Fold Build-in, Fold Surface, Link and Puck Wall Art. You can find them all here.

Now, you're probably saying to yourself, that's all very well and good. Clearly Vibia are committed to this exciting new concept. But does that make it a trend?

Well, it wouldn't if only Vibia were doing it, but they are not.

We see the first example as being Foscarini's Fields of 2007:

Foscarini wall light Fields_White

Then, much more recently, Axo Light's Shatter:

axolight-lightecture-shatter ceiling lights

Flos Wall Piercing:

Flos Wall PiercingQuasar's Sparks:

Quasar Sparks system in a hall

and Luceplan's Synapse:

Luceplan Synapse installation

What do you say now, eh? Convinced?!

Training session at lightjunction 2013

As we said at the top of this post, this is such an important development in decorative lighting, and CREA is such a powerful, yet easy-to-use, tool, that we have asked Vibia to give a half-hour training session at lightjunction each day (except Sunday). So, whichever day you come, you'll be able to attend it.

lightjunction 18 22 September 2013

 

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Seven fine "Potences" -- single arm wall lights that extend outwards over 140cm

Luceplan Counterbalance wall light A BIG hit at recent trade shows has been Daniel Rybakken's Counterbalance for Luceplan. The first thing we all wanted to do was play with it. When they were showing early prototypes, we weren't allowed to, but it was instantly the most talked about light on display. Then the day came when we could! Seldom has a light created such an impact. It extends 192cm.

It is of a type generally referred to as a Potence, after the light of that name designed by Jean Prouvé in 1950 and now available from Vitra. This is "over 2m long":

Vitra Jean Prouvé Potence wall light

Charlotte Perriand, who had worked with Le Corbusier for ten years, formed an architectural practice with Jean Prouvé (and Georges Blanchon) in 1940. Later, she produced her version -- the Portence Pivotante which has recently been reissued by Nemo. This one extends 230cm:

nemo potence pivotante-wall-light-charlotte-perriand

 

Then, soon after, in 1951, the German-born, but England-based, Bernard Schottlander invented his wonderful Mantis range. This is the wall light, that extends 153cm. We have DCW Éditions to thank for their reissuing the collection this year.

DCW Éditions Bernard Schottlander mantis wall

 

 

These weren't the first potences, though.

Bernard-Albin Gras patented the principles behind what is now known as la Lampe Gras in 1921. Again, we thank DCW Éditions for rereleasing this design in all its flamboyant (yet practical) variety. #213 is extendable up to 146cms:

La lampe gras 213 wall light red

 

But the potence which has been most commonly specified over the last forty years is the 265 of 1973 by Paolo Rizzatto for Flos. The short part extends 85cm and the long arm is 205cm...

flos 265 wall light

...and when Delightfull issued the wall version of their Diana (which extends 150cm), they adopted the same format:

delightfull diana wall light blue

Whereas all the lights so far have basically been task/reading lights, Anna Lari's Techno is more a pendant light which happens to be hanging from the wall rather than the ceiling. It is telescopic, from 139cm to 193cm:

Anna lari techno wall light

So, a small but very distinguished family of lights -- so distinguished that there are monographs on Jean Prouvé, Charlotte Perriand and la Lampe Gras, available from Amazon, via our online bookshop.

Why do they matter? First, since (for environmental and comfort reasons), lights should not be placed on or in the ceiling, you need an alternative, if you are to get the light source close to what is being lit. In other situations you may not be able to use the ceiling at all.

Secondly, they are very theatrical. Somewhere out there on the interweb there is a great picture of an architect's office or similar with a row of 265s. When I find it, I'll add it to this post. In the meantime, here are two set shots of 265s being used in smaller quantities...

flos 265 wall light set

flos 265 wall light set...and a Diana:

delightfull diana wall light red

 

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Milan 2013's most exciting lighting trend: graphic!

Vibia Wireflow pendant light Arik Levy "Graphic" is probably not the best name for this trend: it'll be easier to understand what I mean from the pictures.

Above is Wireflow by Arik Levy for Vibia. Three were hanging over the desk on their stand. It is as if someone is drawing in the air. They look two dimensional, though an unexpected effect is to increase awareness of the space that they are in. They are big:

Vibia Wireflow pendant lights with Arik Levy

Earlier that day, we had been delighted by Davide Groppi's N-euro by Beppe Merlano. That is it going up the wall in the back of this picture taken on their stand:

N-EURO pendant light from Davide Groppi

You get the lighting body on one end of a lot of black cable, with a plug to go into a socket at the other end. The round wall attachments allow you to draw across the wall and ceiling, the pattern depending upon where you choose to put them.

N-EURO pendant light from Davide Groppi

But it is not one swalowe that bryngeth in somer. Any more than two lights make a trend. But a third...? This was Michael Anastassiades for Flos -- String Light:

String Light Michael Anastassiades Flos

We are indebted to Domus for this explanation:

String Light Michael Anastassiades Flos

It looked absolutely fabulous:

string light flos michael anastassiades

But, of course, the concept had already been established before Milan 2013 by the visionary Catellani & Smith. The most minimal of all is his Light Stick:

Catellani & Smith Light Stick floor light

and here is his Sorry Giotto:

catellani & smith sorry giotto floor light

He adds another -- almost secret -- level of interest, because the discs are not black, as you'd expect, but copper hand painted with blue.

Such minimal graphic designs in lesser hands could be/will be boring and become a cliché. But here we have four truly stunning pieces.

 

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Information

Milan 2013: Fuori Salone

Euroluce name in colours This is the fifth of a series of posts to be published this week that will build up into our Handy Guide to Euroluce 2013. This one looks at what is happening in Milan itself at the same time. Other posts look at who is in halls nine, eleven, thirteen and fifteen -- the main |Euroluce event at the Rho fairground. The last post in the series will pull all the content together into one document, with updates and corrections. This will then form the basis for our customary PDFs -- alphabetical, and by hall -- for you to use at the Fair. 

That last post in the series will remain up throughout the week of the Fair so that you can download the PDFs , or read it on your mobile thingy, at any time.

EUROLUCE MILAN 2013 – FUORI SALONE

The Milan Furniture Fair “fringe” is becoming as important as the Fairs themselves. Even if manufacturers are showing at the Fair, many also have a separate presence in Milan, where they may display more experimental things (one year, Foscarini did a display of their lights all in white, for example) and where they hold their parties.

Basically, they will intend their presence outwith the Fair to be more cool, and sometimes their products will be displayed in more relevant spaces. Baccarat chandeliers will probably look better in the Palazzo Morando, than on their stand in a big trade fair hall, for example.

You can end up walking quite a long way (and the forecast is for rain throughout the week this year) and then find an empty shop with many examples of one design artfully displayed – i.e. a total waste of time. In other cases, the Milan presence is in their own permanent showrooms, often allowing one to see more of the collection than was on the stand. Then there are companies who only show in Milan, rather than at the fair ground, so you won’t see what they are doing unless you track them down.

There is no way this summary can be complete – it relies on what we have been told. Always pick up the guide published by Interni magazine (there are others), of which there will be free copies at every destination, and at hotels, &c. There will also be banners outside participating locations.

I have grouped these entries by the main locations. There is a miscellaneous section at the end.

BRERA DISTRICT

Atelier Areti EDIT, La Pelota, Via Palermo 10 www.atelierareti.com

Innermost EDIT www.innermost.net

Kalmar EDIT www.kalmarlighting.com

EDIT's web site: thedesignjunction.co.uk/milan

 

Lee Broom Spazio Pontaccio, Via Pontaccio 18 www.leebroom.com

Nendo Spazio Pontaccio     www.nendo.jp/en

Roll & Hill Spazio Pontaccio     www.rollandhill.com

Spazio Pontaccio's web site:   www.spaziopontaccio.it

Foscarini Via Pontaccio 19 www.foscarini.com

Memphis Spazio Understate, Viale Francesco Crispi 5/b, corner of Via Varese store.memphis-milano.com

In spite of my pointing out for years that the products of the great period of Memphis – of Ettore Sottsass, Michele De Lucchi, Matteo Thun &c. – are still available, no client has ever expressed any interest whatsoever. Maybe that’s good thing – maybe their work still shocks and appals. Time, and exposure in books, museums, &c. has not made them desirable – even acceptable – to the mainstream. To see if you are mainstream, go and see the finest pieces from this collection. Cocktails at 19:00 on Friday.

Produzione Privata Via Varese 15 www.produzioneprivata.it

Exceptional pieces (by no means just lighting) from the exceptional architect/designer/artist, Michele De Lucchi. Creating his “private production” out of his studio enables him to work with fine craftspeople and materials. He only ever show on the ground floor of the studio, so this is an essential destination.

Corso Como 10 Corso Como 10 www.10corsocomo.com

One hardly needs an excuse to visit this concept store, but there is a compelling one anyway this year – an Angelo Mangiarotti retrospective. (He designed the iconic – and much copied – Giogali system for Vistosi, made up a glass hooks.)

SAN BABILA Metro M1

This metro station is selected as the hub out from which runs the luxury shopping streets of Via Monte Napoleone, Via Della Spiga, &c. plus the lighting shopping street of Corso Monforte.

Aqua Creations Boutique Mimí, Via Gesù 3 www.aquagallery.com

Artemide showroom, Corso Monforte 19 www.artemide.it

Baccarat Palazzo Morando, Via Sant’Andrea 6 int.baccarat.com/Lighting/lighting,en,sc.html

Barovier & Toso showroom, Via Durini 5, also: Russki Dom, Palazzo Visconti, Via Cino del Duca 8       www.barovier.com

EOQ Entratalibera, Corso Independenza 16 (go to the end of Corso Monforte. Corso Independenza splits: Entratalibera is on the south side) www.eoq-design.com

A young company producing excellent designs by Michael Young, using very high quality production facilities that normally make delicate aluminium pieces – e.g. fascias for technical equipment. Simple, elegant, clean – and colourful (Oh no. I shouldn’t have said colourful.... You’ll not go now.)

Flos showroom, Corso Monforte 9 www.flos.com

Ingo Maurer Spazio Krizia, Via Manin 21 (a bit of a walk, round the park, but essential – you’ll be surprised, delighted...)  www.ingo-maurer.com

Lindsey Adelman Nilufar, Via della Spiga 32 www.lindseyadelman.comThe web site of Nilufar, an important destination in its own right, is www.nilufar.com

Luceplan showroom, Corso Monforte 7 www.luceplan.com

Venini showroom, Via Monte Napoleone 9 www.venini.com

ZONA TORTONA to avoid that terrible bridge, go to Metro Sant’Agostino (M2), cross the big road, and walk down the south side of the little park.

David Trubridge Superstudiopiu’   www.davidtrubridge.com

We have been thrilled to see the increasing levels of awareness and appreciation of David’s work. There is a higher proportion of pieces available in kit form, which dramatically reduces the shipping costs (bearing in mind that he is based in New Zealand). They are as environmentally sound as they look. There is also a playfulness, and an elegance, the sense of the sea.... Plus the virtues of wood – no wonder he is so popular in Scandinavia. By the way, his works are now in our LIGHT FINDER.

Superstudiopiu' web site: http://www.superstudiogroup.com

Lasvit Via Gaspare Bugatti 15 www.lasvit.com

Moooi Via Savona 56 www.moooi.com

1700 sq m housing their “special welcome”...

Contemporary Japanese Design Via Volhera 4 www.c-japandesign.net

VENTURA LAMBRATE go to Metro Lambrate (M2), then cross the railway tracks.

Catellani & Smith Casa della Luce, Via Ventura 5 www.catellanismith.com

 

Woka Vienna Design Week, Via Privata Oslavia 17 www.woka.at

Lobmeyr Vienna Design Week www.lobmeyr.at

Vienna Design Week in Milan web page: www.viennadesignweek.at/news.php?id=628

 

ELSEWHERE

Davide Groppi Chiostri dell’Umanitaria, Via S. Barnaba -- Metro Crocetta (M3) or trams 12, 23 or 27 to Vittoria (Palazzo Giustizia) www.davidegroppi.com

This will be a fabulous display of wonderful, minimal lights in a series of cloisters - -magical at dusk!  Have a look at t the “ichiostri” web site (www.ichiostri.net) to see what I mean – not just a café but cloisters with gardens: “a location full of atmosphere of mystery”. Not just a lighting collection, but also a corner of Milan worth discovering.

Davide Groppi Via Medici 13 -- Metro Crocetta (M3) or trams 2, 3 or 14 to Torino Carrobbio

...and here they will be displaying lighting that is particularly suited to restaurants.

Prandina Triennale -- Metro Cadorna (M1, M2)  prandina.it

One of the best Italian lighting companies, at one of the most important design destinations in the world. The Triennale (recently remodelled internally by Michele De Lucchi) always has lots of interesting things happening during this design week – plus the bookshop and a great café with a large outside area by the park.

The Triennale's web site: www.triennale.it

 

Tom Dixon MOST, Museo natzionale della Scienza e dalle Tecnologia, via Olona 6B -- Metro Sant’Ambrogio (M2) www.tomdixon.net

Sander Mulder MOST www.sandermulder.com

Brokis MOST www.brokis.cz

Brokis is a particularly interesting new brand from the Czech Republic: very high quality glass working and very good, clever, witty designs. New introductions of theirs will also be shown at the Fair on the stand of Misuraemme (hall 7, stands G09 and H16).

Spazio Rossana Orlandi Via Matteo Bandello 14/16 -- Metro Sant’Ambrogio (M2) or Conciliazione (M1) www.rossanaorlandi.com

Another essentuial venue where this year, amongst other things, Baroncelli will be showing Innovo, combining LEDs and bits of old chandeliers. www.baroncelli.com

Windfall Palazzo Durini, Via Santa Maria Valle 2 -- Metro Missori (M3) www.windfall-gmbh.de

The single most important destination. Windfall creates the finest works in contemporary crystal in the world. You want to go there with your head to see what is possible. You want to go there with your heart to experience the thrill of crystal and light (plus beautiful people).

 

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