Luceplan

lightjunction: trend #3 -- modules that you can build up into compositions

vibia origami composition outdoors

lightjunction, our new fine lighting event, will be collocated with designjunction at the Sorting Office on New Oxford Street during London Design Week, 18-22 September 2013

A completely new type of light is creating exciting possibilities!

Each design is a module that, when connected to others, forms a spectacular installation that can cover wide areas.

You decide where they go, so the result is site-specific.

The leading source is Vibia, who are offering modules for use on walls and ceilings, indoors and out.

This is such an important development in decorative lighting that we have asked Vibia to give a half-hour training sessions on it at lightjunction.

To understand what is happening, let's look at their Origami -- the light featured in the image above.

There are just two shapes...

Vibia Origami wall light shapes

...out of which you can make compositions on a wall and/or ceiling. They connect together electrically, so you only need one power supply. Origami can be used inside or out-of-doors.

That's it really, because the rest is up to you!

Here are some arrangements that others have done:

Vibia origami wall light composition

vibia origami wall light composition exterior

vibia origami wall light composition

And here is a a video that briefly shows how it is done:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=-Tbvj2MyqtI

The video introduces you to Vibia's Create Your Project (CREA), a free, easy-to-use software tool that becomes more exciting the more you get to know it. We'll cover it more fully in another post but, for now, understand that Vibia were responding to the fact that, whilst the possibilities of these compositions are huge, we are all likely to need a bit of help composing them!

We want to play about with different configurations, then, when we are happy with our design, our clients need to see what we have done, so that they can approve it.

Therefore, CREA produces a 3D simulation, which can show much more than just the Vibia composition. This is why it becomes such a useful tool. You can produce professional-quality 3D visualizations of your proposals without having to involve anybody else!

It also produces a installation manual specific to your composition.

If CREA helps if you are using Origami, it is essential if you want to make up something magical using Vibia's  Match!  This module could not be used if it were not for CREA.

It starts simply enough:

vibia match pendant light composition

but pretty quickly it grows into this:

vibia match pendant light composition

The way CREA works for Match is that you tell it what area you want lit. It then works out where the light bodies need to be, and presents you with a variety of suitable arrangements from which you choose. It is certainly worth it for results like these:

vibia match pendant light installation

vibia match pendant light installation

Here's another helpful little video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=4zpZtOLHPsY

Match is just one of Vibia's pendant-type modules. Others are Ameba, Halo Circular, Halo Lineal and Rhythm. For the ceiling, there are Link XXL and Link. For the wall, besides Origami, there is Fold Build-in, Fold Surface, Link and Puck Wall Art. You can find them all here.

Now, you're probably saying to yourself, that's all very well and good. Clearly Vibia are committed to this exciting new concept. But does that make it a trend?

Well, it wouldn't if only Vibia were doing it, but they are not.

We see the first example as being Foscarini's Fields of 2007:

Foscarini wall light Fields_White

Then, much more recently, Axo Light's Shatter:

axolight-lightecture-shatter ceiling lights

Flos Wall Piercing:

Flos Wall PiercingQuasar's Sparks:

Quasar Sparks system in a hall

and Luceplan's Synapse:

Luceplan Synapse installation

What do you say now, eh? Convinced?!

Training session at lightjunction 2013

As we said at the top of this post, this is such an important development in decorative lighting, and CREA is such a powerful, yet easy-to-use, tool, that we have asked Vibia to give a half-hour training session at lightjunction each day (except Sunday). So, whichever day you come, you'll be able to attend it.

lightjunction 18 22 September 2013

 

Print Friendly and PDF

Seven fine outdoor standard lamps

Luceplan grande costanza open air floor light outdoor exterior Over the past few years, there has been a growing trend towards outdoor versions of indoor lights. This allows for the creation of outdoor rooms. You can also take a light and repeat it, first indoors and then outdoors. If you have a large plate glass window, the parade of lights can be seamless, powerfully connecting the exterior space with the interior space.

Here is an exterior version of Luceplan's iconic Costanza -- the Grande Costanza Open Air:

Luceplan Grance-air-01-21322-1The shade can be off-white, "rust" or light green. The structure can be white, aluminium or -- as in the top picture -- rust (a good finish for an outdoor light).

In most territories, there are no specific IP ratings required for outdoor lights. Instead, the manufacturer must make every aspect of the luminaire suitable for exterior use. This is not just a question of electrical safety: they also have to think about the effect of rain, sun, sand, salt and wind on the structure and materials.

This is what is going on inside the Grande Costanza shade...

Luceplan grande costanza open air detail

...the lamp and its holder are inside a sealed glass tube.

FontanaArte's Amax seems the odd one out in this company because it is so big. There are two versions: H205cm Ø82cm, or a humungous H240 Ø109cm (but then the indoor Amax is very big as well). Its size gives it a visual impact from a distance that smaller lights could never have.

FontanaArte amax terra outdoor floor light exterior standard lamp

To really get the effect of a standard lamp, it's fun to have a shade made from something that looks like a fabric that you might use in a drawing room.

Plis, one of Vibia's two outdoor standard lamps...

Vibia Plis 4035 outdoor standard lamp exterior floor light

...has a warm-toned polyethylene shade that is ribbed, as if it was made with ribbon.

Vibia Plis outdoor standard lamp detail

Whereas their Wind has an open weave shade that is in fact made from glass fibre filaments (in green, orange, white or black).

Vibia Wind 4055 outdoor standard lamp exterior floor light

The shade of Marset's lovely TXL is also made from fibre glass and plastic, to give a warm, fabric-like effect:

Marset TXL pitdopor standard lamp exterior floor lightLike several of these outdoor standard lamps, TXL is part of a family of outdoor versions of indoor lights. Here is the pendant (in the snow):

Marset TXL outdoor standard lamp exterior floor light

Bover's fine wicker (actually a polyethylene fibre) Fora...

Bover fora pie outdoor standard lamp exterior floor light

has a matching table light:

Bover fora mesa outdoor table light

However, all the lights so far have to be plugged in, but you are not going to have power sockets all around your garden, park or beach, as you do in the rooms of your house. Ideally, therefore, you would be able to pick up your standard lamp and plonk it down anywhere.

Those really nice people at Viteo thought this too and so came up with Zoe...

viteo zoe outdoor standard lamp exterior floor light cordless...which has solar panels on the top. About fifteen hours charging give five to six hours of light from the 7W 3000K LED light source. But what if you don't want a cordless version? That's OK: Viteo have introduced Zoe Basic, which you plug in -- just like all the others!

Print Friendly and PDF

Seven fine "Potences" -- single arm wall lights that extend outwards over 140cm

Luceplan Counterbalance wall light A BIG hit at recent trade shows has been Daniel Rybakken's Counterbalance for Luceplan. The first thing we all wanted to do was play with it. When they were showing early prototypes, we weren't allowed to, but it was instantly the most talked about light on display. Then the day came when we could! Seldom has a light created such an impact. It extends 192cm.

It is of a type generally referred to as a Potence, after the light of that name designed by Jean Prouvé in 1950 and now available from Vitra. This is "over 2m long":

Vitra Jean Prouvé Potence wall light

Charlotte Perriand, who had worked with Le Corbusier for ten years, formed an architectural practice with Jean Prouvé (and Georges Blanchon) in 1940. Later, she produced her version -- the Portence Pivotante which has recently been reissued by Nemo. This one extends 230cm:

nemo potence pivotante-wall-light-charlotte-perriand

 

Then, soon after, in 1951, the German-born, but England-based, Bernard Schottlander invented his wonderful Mantis range. This is the wall light, that extends 153cm. We have DCW Éditions to thank for their reissuing the collection this year.

DCW Éditions Bernard Schottlander mantis wall

 

 

These weren't the first potences, though.

Bernard-Albin Gras patented the principles behind what is now known as la Lampe Gras in 1921. Again, we thank DCW Éditions for rereleasing this design in all its flamboyant (yet practical) variety. #213 is extendable up to 146cms:

La lampe gras 213 wall light red

 

But the potence which has been most commonly specified over the last forty years is the 265 of 1973 by Paolo Rizzatto for Flos. The short part extends 85cm and the long arm is 205cm...

flos 265 wall light

...and when Delightfull issued the wall version of their Diana (which extends 150cm), they adopted the same format:

delightfull diana wall light blue

Whereas all the lights so far have basically been task/reading lights, Anna Lari's Techno is more a pendant light which happens to be hanging from the wall rather than the ceiling. It is telescopic, from 139cm to 193cm:

Anna lari techno wall light

So, a small but very distinguished family of lights -- so distinguished that there are monographs on Jean Prouvé, Charlotte Perriand and la Lampe Gras, available from Amazon, via our online bookshop.

Why do they matter? First, since (for environmental and comfort reasons), lights should not be placed on or in the ceiling, you need an alternative, if you are to get the light source close to what is being lit. In other situations you may not be able to use the ceiling at all.

Secondly, they are very theatrical. Somewhere out there on the interweb there is a great picture of an architect's office or similar with a row of 265s. When I find it, I'll add it to this post. In the meantime, here are two set shots of 265s being used in smaller quantities...

flos 265 wall light set

flos 265 wall light set...and a Diana:

delightfull diana wall light red

 

Print Friendly and PDF

Information

Milan 2013: Fuori Salone

Euroluce name in colours This is the fifth of a series of posts to be published this week that will build up into our Handy Guide to Euroluce 2013. This one looks at what is happening in Milan itself at the same time. Other posts look at who is in halls nine, eleven, thirteen and fifteen -- the main |Euroluce event at the Rho fairground. The last post in the series will pull all the content together into one document, with updates and corrections. This will then form the basis for our customary PDFs -- alphabetical, and by hall -- for you to use at the Fair. 

That last post in the series will remain up throughout the week of the Fair so that you can download the PDFs , or read it on your mobile thingy, at any time.

EUROLUCE MILAN 2013 – FUORI SALONE

The Milan Furniture Fair “fringe” is becoming as important as the Fairs themselves. Even if manufacturers are showing at the Fair, many also have a separate presence in Milan, where they may display more experimental things (one year, Foscarini did a display of their lights all in white, for example) and where they hold their parties.

Basically, they will intend their presence outwith the Fair to be more cool, and sometimes their products will be displayed in more relevant spaces. Baccarat chandeliers will probably look better in the Palazzo Morando, than on their stand in a big trade fair hall, for example.

You can end up walking quite a long way (and the forecast is for rain throughout the week this year) and then find an empty shop with many examples of one design artfully displayed – i.e. a total waste of time. In other cases, the Milan presence is in their own permanent showrooms, often allowing one to see more of the collection than was on the stand. Then there are companies who only show in Milan, rather than at the fair ground, so you won’t see what they are doing unless you track them down.

There is no way this summary can be complete – it relies on what we have been told. Always pick up the guide published by Interni magazine (there are others), of which there will be free copies at every destination, and at hotels, &c. There will also be banners outside participating locations.

I have grouped these entries by the main locations. There is a miscellaneous section at the end.

BRERA DISTRICT

Atelier Areti EDIT, La Pelota, Via Palermo 10 www.atelierareti.com

Innermost EDIT www.innermost.net

Kalmar EDIT www.kalmarlighting.com

EDIT's web site: thedesignjunction.co.uk/milan

 

Lee Broom Spazio Pontaccio, Via Pontaccio 18 www.leebroom.com

Nendo Spazio Pontaccio     www.nendo.jp/en

Roll & Hill Spazio Pontaccio     www.rollandhill.com

Spazio Pontaccio's web site:   www.spaziopontaccio.it

Foscarini Via Pontaccio 19 www.foscarini.com

Memphis Spazio Understate, Viale Francesco Crispi 5/b, corner of Via Varese store.memphis-milano.com

In spite of my pointing out for years that the products of the great period of Memphis – of Ettore Sottsass, Michele De Lucchi, Matteo Thun &c. – are still available, no client has ever expressed any interest whatsoever. Maybe that’s good thing – maybe their work still shocks and appals. Time, and exposure in books, museums, &c. has not made them desirable – even acceptable – to the mainstream. To see if you are mainstream, go and see the finest pieces from this collection. Cocktails at 19:00 on Friday.

Produzione Privata Via Varese 15 www.produzioneprivata.it

Exceptional pieces (by no means just lighting) from the exceptional architect/designer/artist, Michele De Lucchi. Creating his “private production” out of his studio enables him to work with fine craftspeople and materials. He only ever show on the ground floor of the studio, so this is an essential destination.

Corso Como 10 Corso Como 10 www.10corsocomo.com

One hardly needs an excuse to visit this concept store, but there is a compelling one anyway this year – an Angelo Mangiarotti retrospective. (He designed the iconic – and much copied – Giogali system for Vistosi, made up a glass hooks.)

SAN BABILA Metro M1

This metro station is selected as the hub out from which runs the luxury shopping streets of Via Monte Napoleone, Via Della Spiga, &c. plus the lighting shopping street of Corso Monforte.

Aqua Creations Boutique Mimí, Via Gesù 3 www.aquagallery.com

Artemide showroom, Corso Monforte 19 www.artemide.it

Baccarat Palazzo Morando, Via Sant’Andrea 6 int.baccarat.com/Lighting/lighting,en,sc.html

Barovier & Toso showroom, Via Durini 5, also: Russki Dom, Palazzo Visconti, Via Cino del Duca 8       www.barovier.com

EOQ Entratalibera, Corso Independenza 16 (go to the end of Corso Monforte. Corso Independenza splits: Entratalibera is on the south side) www.eoq-design.com

A young company producing excellent designs by Michael Young, using very high quality production facilities that normally make delicate aluminium pieces – e.g. fascias for technical equipment. Simple, elegant, clean – and colourful (Oh no. I shouldn’t have said colourful.... You’ll not go now.)

Flos showroom, Corso Monforte 9 www.flos.com

Ingo Maurer Spazio Krizia, Via Manin 21 (a bit of a walk, round the park, but essential – you’ll be surprised, delighted...)  www.ingo-maurer.com

Lindsey Adelman Nilufar, Via della Spiga 32 www.lindseyadelman.comThe web site of Nilufar, an important destination in its own right, is www.nilufar.com

Luceplan showroom, Corso Monforte 7 www.luceplan.com

Venini showroom, Via Monte Napoleone 9 www.venini.com

ZONA TORTONA to avoid that terrible bridge, go to Metro Sant’Agostino (M2), cross the big road, and walk down the south side of the little park.

David Trubridge Superstudiopiu’   www.davidtrubridge.com

We have been thrilled to see the increasing levels of awareness and appreciation of David’s work. There is a higher proportion of pieces available in kit form, which dramatically reduces the shipping costs (bearing in mind that he is based in New Zealand). They are as environmentally sound as they look. There is also a playfulness, and an elegance, the sense of the sea.... Plus the virtues of wood – no wonder he is so popular in Scandinavia. By the way, his works are now in our LIGHT FINDER.

Superstudiopiu' web site: http://www.superstudiogroup.com

Lasvit Via Gaspare Bugatti 15 www.lasvit.com

Moooi Via Savona 56 www.moooi.com

1700 sq m housing their “special welcome”...

Contemporary Japanese Design Via Volhera 4 www.c-japandesign.net

VENTURA LAMBRATE go to Metro Lambrate (M2), then cross the railway tracks.

Catellani & Smith Casa della Luce, Via Ventura 5 www.catellanismith.com

 

Woka Vienna Design Week, Via Privata Oslavia 17 www.woka.at

Lobmeyr Vienna Design Week www.lobmeyr.at

Vienna Design Week in Milan web page: www.viennadesignweek.at/news.php?id=628

 

ELSEWHERE

Davide Groppi Chiostri dell’Umanitaria, Via S. Barnaba -- Metro Crocetta (M3) or trams 12, 23 or 27 to Vittoria (Palazzo Giustizia) www.davidegroppi.com

This will be a fabulous display of wonderful, minimal lights in a series of cloisters - -magical at dusk!  Have a look at t the “ichiostri” web site (www.ichiostri.net) to see what I mean – not just a café but cloisters with gardens: “a location full of atmosphere of mystery”. Not just a lighting collection, but also a corner of Milan worth discovering.

Davide Groppi Via Medici 13 -- Metro Crocetta (M3) or trams 2, 3 or 14 to Torino Carrobbio

...and here they will be displaying lighting that is particularly suited to restaurants.

Prandina Triennale -- Metro Cadorna (M1, M2)  prandina.it

One of the best Italian lighting companies, at one of the most important design destinations in the world. The Triennale (recently remodelled internally by Michele De Lucchi) always has lots of interesting things happening during this design week – plus the bookshop and a great café with a large outside area by the park.

The Triennale's web site: www.triennale.it

 

Tom Dixon MOST, Museo natzionale della Scienza e dalle Tecnologia, via Olona 6B -- Metro Sant’Ambrogio (M2) www.tomdixon.net

Sander Mulder MOST www.sandermulder.com

Brokis MOST www.brokis.cz

Brokis is a particularly interesting new brand from the Czech Republic: very high quality glass working and very good, clever, witty designs. New introductions of theirs will also be shown at the Fair on the stand of Misuraemme (hall 7, stands G09 and H16).

Spazio Rossana Orlandi Via Matteo Bandello 14/16 -- Metro Sant’Ambrogio (M2) or Conciliazione (M1) www.rossanaorlandi.com

Another essentuial venue where this year, amongst other things, Baroncelli will be showing Innovo, combining LEDs and bits of old chandeliers. www.baroncelli.com

Windfall Palazzo Durini, Via Santa Maria Valle 2 -- Metro Missori (M3) www.windfall-gmbh.de

The single most important destination. Windfall creates the finest works in contemporary crystal in the world. You want to go there with your head to see what is possible. You want to go there with your heart to experience the thrill of crystal and light (plus beautiful people).

 

Print Friendly and PDF

Information

Euroluce 2013: Hall 13

Euroluce name in colours

 

This is the third of a series of posts to be published this week that will build up into our Handy Guide to Euroluce 2013. This one looks at who is a hall thirteen. Other posts look at who is in other halls and also what is happening where fuori salone. The last post in the series will pull all the content together into one document, with updates and corrections. This will then form the basis for our customary PDFs -- alphabetical, and by hall -- for you to use at the Fair. 

That last post in the series will remain up throughout the week of the Fair so that you can download the PDFs , or read it on your mobile thingy, at any time.

EUROLUCE MILAN 2013 – HALL 13

Anglepoise E10 www.anglepoise.com

Anglepoise need no introduction from us. Last year they celebrated the 75th anniversary of the original 1227. We are so pleased that they have been able to bring this design back – the “anglepoise” – with its art deco base. See also the variation on this design – the Duo Table Lamp. There are also a Duo floor light and a Duo applique.

 Anna Lari F01 www.annalari.com

Besides their iconic tall lights with small adjustable shades in a variety of materials, Anna lari have got some other great designs in their collection.The latest are a series of table task lights powered by LEDs (Funky, Giorgia and Jazz) plus two appliques – Luna (a simple half-hemisphere) and Techno (a useful light that has a smallish lampshade hanging from an adjustable arm).

Catellani & Smith C10 www.catellanismith.com

The lightmaker’s lightmaker. Fabulous effects from a variety of materials, including gold and silver leaf used in his own way. Spectacular effects from simple pebbles of glass. Tiny, tiny LED light sources that do not interfere with the main design of the luminaire, even when positioned between the luminaire and the viewer.  An essential stand, in this case because you have to see for yourself that the real lights really do look as amazing in real life as they can in pictures!

Delightfull G09 www.delightfull.eu

Always a delight, this young company can be relied upon to brighten every lighting trade fair with their rapidly-expanding jazz-inspired collection. A happy band of people clearly has fun dreaming up great designs, that are also very well made.

Estro L19 M20 www.estro.it

Estro has just bought Luminara, so we expect to see their lights also on this stand. Both collections are particularly well suited to hospitality applications – Luminara’s one-off pieces mostly  in public areas and Estro’s collection stronger for quantity in guest rooms.

Flos C09 D18 www.flos.com

Another essential stand. Besides continuing with lights designed by some of the best designers around, that are featuring in their new advertising campaign (Philippe Starck, obviously, but also  the Bouroullecs and Patricia Urquiola), Flos are also inventing a new form of light/luminaire that they are calling “soft architecture”. This is a big thing to do, that requires a new attitude to lighting from architects and interior designers. Their stand would be essential viewing for this reason alone.

Stop press: Paul Cocksedge says that he has designed a new light for Flos, provisionally called Shade. Being Paul, it is not just any old pendant lampshade! In trying to resolve a purely practical problem -- how to get power to the lamp in the pendant, avoiding the standard solutions of having the shade hang from a thick flex, or from wires plus a wiggly power cable -- the solution "...actually turned out quite mysterious, almost dream-like. It utilizes floor and ceiling both, but appears unconnected to either...!" So now you have to visit the Flos stand to see how he did it!

Forestier G08 www.forestier.fr

A very varied collection of strong pieces from this French maker, by designers of the calibre of Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance, Ionna Vautrin and Neil Poulton. Recent introductions include the attractive Antenna table light and pendant by Arik Levy.

frauMaier G11 www.fraumaier.com

Recent attendees at my presentations will know how fond we are of frauMaier. Not just because frauMaier is the cute dog that features in their catalogue and on their web site, but also because theirs is a powerful collection of colourful and useful lights. Is there a better design for placing behind a sofa that their ThinLissie – the light body thrust forward and the structure very thin so that it can go behind and under the sofa, even if it is flush to the wall?

Graypants L10 www.graypants.com

Ignore the unfortunate name for a moment and focus instead on some surprisingly good looking shades made from corrugated paper. The result is environmentally-sound-looking designs with a varied and interesting colour and surface. I don’t know how long they last, though – I saw a similar shade in the window of a bar that was obviously falling to pieces, but it may not have been one of the theirs. One of the many evils that result from fakes is that people end up judging the real thing by the fake that they have experienced, not realizing that it is a fake. Note that this is another rare instance of a collection that originates in America that comes in European versions (they also have an office in the Netherlands).

Hive H16 www.designbyhive.com

Hive is the excellent light collection from the Filipino designer, Kenneth Cobonpue (though the lights are not all designed by him) .The materials that he uses (mostly overtly from nature), and the size of some of his pieces, reflect warmer, sunnier climes, so that even if they are not intended to be used outdoors, they look as if they could be. The Hive collection is no exception.

Ilide H19 www.ilide.it

We are excited by the premise behind Ilide, a new Italian lighting design company. They are bringing designers together with artisans who work in different materials: glass, ceramics, wood, burnt (and then stabilized) wood, marble…. They found the best by selecting the top 20 from a competition they held in 2010 that attracted more than 1,000 participants from all over Italy. It is a brave economic climate within which to start a new lighting company but such bravery is necessary if viable companies are to exist in the future, and this is the right way to go about it. To add to their existing collection, they are launching at Euroluce a new collection, called Value and Light, consisting of “...five items made from various natural materials.”

Jake Dyson L09 M10 www.jakedyson.com

Jake Dyson’s USP is lights that move. Since his first was a spot light, it was not relevant to us. However his second, CSYS, is a family of LED task lights that have precision movements and a design related to a crane. We are looking forward to seeing it (and, if we are allowed to, moving it up and down and to and fro). It should be a great Boy’s Toy!

Lasvit F12 www.lasvit.com

Lasvit’s strengths are the power of their marketing and the quality of the designers they use. Their stands are often spectacular, therefore. From the list of designers that they say will be represented on their stand at Euroluce, the individual items will reward close attention as well.

Leucos A11 B04 www.fdvgroup.com/LEUCOS

Leucos is now part of the FDV Group. Although this is contradicted by the web site, there are rumours that the catalogues of all the FDV brands (itre, Muranodue, Aureliano Toso, Gallery Vetri d’Arte, Alt Lucialternative, Luxit) will be unified under the Leucos name. Besides Luxit (hall 15), Leucos is the only FDV brand to have a stand at Euroluce – the most important lighting fair for the Italian market. So we look forward to seeing what is on it.

lightyears D01 www.lightyears.dk

A very strong collection of relatively few designs, but good ones, often available in many typologies and sizes (notably, the hugely successful Caravaggio by Cecilie Manz, of which they have just introduced a wall version). Besides other designs by Cecilie Manz, they will be showing new lights from Jo Hammerborg and Nicholai Wiig Hansen.

Luceplan B19 C18 www.luceplan.com

Luceplan have been adding some very good, innovative designs to their collection recently and this Euroluce will be no exception, with new lights from Alberto Meda, Paolo Rizzatto and Daniel Rybakken. Hope is a future classic that one should never waste the opportunity to see. Honeycomb is a clever modular system that is easy to understand once you have seen (and maybe had explained to you) a real one.

Marset D05 E06 www.marset.com

Another wonderful lighting company from Barcelona! A large, very strong (e.g. Discoco), very varied, well-made collection backed up by an efficient operation.  What more would you want?

Michael Anastassiades D07 www.michaelanastassiades.com

One of the best designers of lights, bar none, it is great that visitors to Euroluce will have the chance to see his work. He staged a fine tribute to Josef Frank at Svenskt Tenn during the Stockholm Fair in February. I wonder whether we will see any influences from this in his new work....

Northern Lighting E05 www.northernlighting.no

Not just one of our favourite lighting companies from Norway, but one of our favourites from anywhere! Maybe because of the unusual, brave, quirky, useful collection; maybe because of the great people; or maybe because of their deep understanding of human nature, demonstrated not only by their collection, but also by their hiring the best barmen in Norway to run the best bar in the show – on their stand....

Oluce A19 www.oluce.com

Oluce is a custodian of important 20th century designs (the most exciting trend in lighting today),  with a back list of works by people like Joe Colombo and Vico Magistretti. But they are not resting on their laurels. It is interesting to see the different reactions of companies to the virtual collapse of their markets. Oluce’s reaction is intelligent and energetic. We’ll see more lights from them that are suitable for contract, plus an openness to specials, and a real interest in fully custom items. The stand itself will have seats (hooray!) and an area for specifiers – again, showing an understanding of what the market (in this case, seriously interested visitors to the Fair) wants.

Örsjö F02 www.orsjo.com

Örsjö had a great stand at Stockholm, and the stand at Euroluce should be just as good, with lots of versions of their Baklava light-in-a-bag, a big version their Kvist (or, what-happens-when-a-plumber-decides-to-make-a-chandelier – actually, it was inspired by twigs on a tree). Look out for Vinge, a new table light, not yet in the catalogue, designed for them by the fashionable Note Design Studio (with the biggest, heaviest, most satisfying dimmer switch ever!) and, if it is there, Talk, a simple, elegant leather covered task light that we had overlooked until we saw it in Malmstenbutiken.

Rich Brilliant Willing L04 www.richbrilliantwilling.com

Another (justifiably) fashionable design consultancy, with a Scandinavian feel, though they are, in fact, American. They say that Rich Brilliant Willing “...is America’s premier contemporary lighting and furniture design manufacturer.” Before you get too excited by some of their cool products, though, remember that just because an American company markets its products in Europe, it does not mean they can be used here!!! If they do not meet CE regulations, they are illegal and potentially dangerous. It is easy to tell: one of the requirements of the regulations is that any product that complies is clearly marked CE, so that the consumer can see that it does. So, if you are on their stand when I am, you’ll see me turning their lights upside down...now you know why. I hope theirs do comply.

Roll & Hill G02 www.rollandhill.com

...whereas New York City-based Roll & Hill are systematically engineering European versions of their lights. As a result, they provide a valuable service by selling international versions of designs by studios that also sell directly, but maybe only American versions – such as Lindsey Adelman and – yes – Rich Brilliant Willing.... Generally, though a young company, Roll and Hill is already becoming an internationally important source for very good, often large, pieces from leading American designers.

Stop press: look out for a stunning new wall light, Stella, by Rosie Li.

Rotaliana B07 www.rotaliana.com

We are glad that Rotaliana are showing, because we want to catch up with what they are doing. Their web site does not seem to have been updated for two years (the main announcement on the home page is about Euroluce 2011...), yet they don't only have good lights in their collection, they also have quirky objects that have demonstrated original thought, and fill needs nothing else fills – I’m thinking of their MultiPot, now joined by wittily designed Eolo (that provides “...chromatic light and ambient fragrances”), LaDiva (a task light and loudspeaker with an iPhone dock, plus radio &c.). And MulitBook, that not only recharges electric things, as the MultiPot does, but also contains an alarm clock. So, it’ll be very interesting to see what they have come up with this year!

SCE N21 www.sce-france.com

SCE is a french company with a range so varied that it is easy to overlook what is there – put another way, there is no such thing as a “typical” SCE light (actually, having just written that and looked again at what they do, I’m not so sure, but I’ll let is stand because it is a bit true.)  You’ll get an idea from the names they give their collections: Contemporain, Charme, Ethno-chic, Déco and Black & white. You get an even better idea if you have a good look at what is on their stand, of course.

Secto E04 www.sectodesign.fi

A wonderful collection of lights that work in so many different environments. With any luck, we will see the new Aspiro pendant. Using his signature pressed birch, Seppo Koho has created free-falling spirals. It will only be available in birch, but the cables can be black or red. Also, if you have not yet seen it, look out for the walnut veneered versions of the rest of the collection, a finish that was introduced last year.

Serafini E11 www.serafiniluce.it

Serafini is a marble working company that, besides doing all kinds of bespoke marble products, has introduced a range of lights, made primarily from calacatta marble and travertine. So, rather than being lights from a product designer who occasionally chooses to use marble, these are lights from people who truly understand the materials, because they work with them every day. For the Fair, they are introducing Chapeau, a pendant with a simple, nicely shaped reflector above an exposed lamp – a traditional Italian typology, but never before in travertine!

Wästberg B11 www.wastberg.com

No new lighting company has so deliberately pinned its colours to the mast of working with the most fashionable designers. Thus, the first collection, in 2008, comprised task lights by James Irvine, Jean-Marie Massaud, Ilse Crawford and Claesson Koivisto Rune. Subsequently, David Chipperfield and Maarten Van Severen have designed for Wästberg, amongst others that include Inga Sempé, whose wonderful design is particularly good as pendant (though there is a task light version, of course!). The result is trade fair stands that are achieving the status of a design museum. And the focus on task lights makes total sense to people in the trade, since they are possibly the most interesting type of light.

Print Friendly and PDF