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Euroluce 2013: Hall 11

  Euroluce name in colours

This is the second of a series of posts to be published this week that will build up into our Handy Guide to Euroluce 2013. This one looks at who is a hall eleven. Other posts look at who is in other halls and also what is happening where fuori salone. The last post in the series will pull all the content together into one document, with updates and corrections. This will then form the basis for our customary PDFs -- alphabetical, and by hall -- for you to use at the Fair. 

That last post in the series will remain up throughout the week of the Fair so that you can download the PDFs , or read it on your mobile thingy, at any time.

EUROLUCE MILAN 2013 – HALL 11

Album D21 E20 www.album.it

You MUST visit this stand, even if you visit no others! The reason is that Album’s systems make possible results that it would otherwise be very difficult to achieve. This includes getting the light source as near as possible to the thing being lit – essential if you are serious about saving energy. But it is never really clear what they can do until you have seen for yourself, when you will also discover how beautifully designed the lighting bodies are. When you add to these strengths the fact that they are one of the few decorative lighting companies using LEDs well, and that they now have an outdoor collection...well you can perhaps begin to understand why you should visit their stand!

Artemide C19 D28 www.artemide.com

One of the most important companies in decorative lighting, that manages to bring out very good, very interesting lights from top designers every year – for example, one of several innovative spot lights new to their catalogue is Cata, designed by Carlotta de Bevilacqua, that won this year’s prestigious IF Product Design award. This stand is, of course, a must.

Arturo Alvarez C35 www.arturo-alvarez.com

Arturo Alvarez will be introducing to their already strong offering new lights using LEDs and silicone, that are specifically designed with the hospitality and project markets in mind. With the world mired in the financial doldrums, this is a good approach. The designs need not be compromised by having to suit a particular market and/or function – quite the opposite.

Baga F27 F31 www.patriziagarganti.com

Patrizia Garganti has added several more brands to the original Baga – Lovelylight, Bespoke Lighting Design, ME, Atelier Tailor Made – and we saw some useful designs at their stand two years ago. But they never sent us the information that they had promised, so I suppose the message is caveat emptor.

Céline Wright D25 www.celinewright.com

We are so pleased Céline Wright will be showing at Euroluce! No-one makes lighter pieces than she does: floating shapes – large and small – from paper, often suspended from the most delicate structures, that may be complemented by the use of a pebble to provide weight. This year she has introduced her new Arabesque collection, that look a bit like the outline of a whirling Dervish!

Danese C19 D28 www.danesemilano.com

Danese have a larger collection of lights, both professional and decorative, than you may have realised. By showing at Euroluce, it will be possible to focus on this segment of their collection.

Davide Groppi B29 C32 www.davidegroppi.com

Another essential stand! What they do is so elegant, so minimal that you could whizz past with just a glance. Big mistake! There is an amazing team joyfully at work here, producing their own unique solutions to lighting requirements in a variety of locations, particularly restaurant tables.  They manage to create luminaires that look like sculptures hanging over a table that mysteriously has puddles of light on it – i.e. it is not obvious that the luminaires are producing the light (and there is no glare). Difficult to describe, but easy to see. If you look...

Fine Art Lamps H55 www.fineartlamps.com

Fine Art Lamps is one of the very few American lighting companies that bothers to make international versions of their lights, so they can be used in Europe. This is good for all those UK designers who are drawn to American-style lights. It is also good because, in a very varied collection, there are some humdingers.

FontanaArte B21 C18 www.fontanaarte.com

Since becoming part of the NICE Group, we have been delighted to see FontanaArte recovering its mojo. Already one of the finest collections of 20th century designs – partly by keeping models from the 1930s onwards in their collection – they are now adding further strong designs, some of which are classics and some of which are new. Look out for the beautiful, minimal floor light called Yumi. Remember, UK specifiers, that they now keep a stock of their main designs in UK for quick delivery. This is bound to be a stand not to be missed!

Foscarini A19 B24 www.foscarini.com

Another of the very greatest names in decorative lighting, the quality of whose collection is matched by the efficiency of their operation. A huge stand (880sq m), again designed by Ferruccio Laviani, that will have space for proper meetings and discussions, and 200sq m set aside for the Successful Living from Diesel collection.

They have a programme of talks where specific lights are discussed by their designers. It is really interesting to be taken through the process of design. You may then understand better why it takes, on average, two years from original concept until when a light is commercially available. Download Foscarini's Meet the Designers sessions to see who is talking and when.

Innermost D23 E24 www.innermost.net

A UK company that can hold its head high, mixing it with the most design-advanced exhibitors in Paris, Stockholm and Milan, thanks to their fascinating and growing collection, that is also well-priced. When you are on the stand, get up close’n’personal (with the lights) – for example, Glaze, that appears to be made from an impossible liaison between copper and ivory....

Kalmar F35 www.kalmarlighting.com

The Viennese company, Kalmar, is over 130 years old and has a history that embraces, for example,  Josef Frank’s and Oskar Wlach’s avant-garde pre-war furnishing showrooms, Haus & Garten, so they have an amazing archive that they are now plundering to create their Werkstätten collection. The designs are fantastic, the quality of production is equally fantastic – we are delighted by the very positive reactions we get to pictures of the collection, so please do make the most of the opportunity to see the real things, up close.

Karboxx E34 www.karboxx.com

Karboxx fascinates because of its dedication to innovative materials, such as carbon fibre and refined glass fibre, that make possible designs (light, strong, often minimal) that could not be be made in other materials. That does not mean that their collection is impractical – quite the opposite. It does mean, though, that a visit to their stand is always justified, to see what new things they have come up with.

Lampe Gras E35 lampegras.fr and

Lampe B. Schottlander E35 www.schottlander.fr

This is a stand that we will be making a bee-line for. DCW Éditions have already brought back the iconic Lampe Gras, that gets ever more exciting, with longer articulated structures (as if made by a mad plumber) and new, cool, colourways. The latest versions (two table lights, one floor-standing uplighter, one pendant and four wall lights) will be shown.

However, they are now also re-editing a collection dating from 1951, designed by the German-born Englishman, Bernard Schottlander. He was an artist, engineer, and fan of Alexander Calder’s who devised a clever system of counterweights that are combined with a series of strong and flexible metal bars. To these are attached aluminium shades. He creates a helical movement in which the symmetrical and the asymmetrical are in opposition. Very much of their period, when you see them you will understand how useful such designs, from a reliable supplier, will be.

Lamp di Volpato Patrizia F28 www.patriziavolpato.it

One of the best sources of chandeliers made from triedri, quadriedri and triangular bars of optical glass (a standard Venetian concept that gives you more of the magical play of light and glass for your euro or pound than anything else), they also have an extensive collection of Italian contemporary designs.

 Laudarte H40 www.laudarte.com

Laudarte now also have Leone Aliotti and Leo Mirai under their wing – collections from all three will be on their stand. Leone Aliotti’s designs are traditional, gold, highly decorated, with lampshades. Leo Mirai’s also have lampshades, but the bases are simpler and in nickel. Laudarte’s own collection tends towards Leone Aliotti’s, but there are some other interesting designs – e.g. lanterns. Laudarte are a good source of custom pieces.

Le Porcellane F33 www.leporcellane.it

Few foreigners would associate Florence with fine porcelain, but the long-standing presence of Richard Ginori in Sesto Fiorentino has resulted in the presence thee of smaller companies set up by people that they have trained. Le Porcellane does wonderful traditional collections that include lamp bases. We have not felt that their shades (which they buy in) are as good as their bases, though – do let us know what you think.

  LZF D32 www.lzf-lamps.com

LZF have taken a specific material – the thin strip of wood veneer – and created a large and very varied collection using it. All the pieces benefit from its attractive nature, which is strengthened by the imaginative designs and, frequently, pastel colouring (that never conceals the grain).

Mazzuccato G33 www.mazzuccatomurano.it

Mazzuccato is the real deal – a furnace, still run by one a scion of the great Murano glass families, and still on Murano. They have the finest collection of traditional Muranese designs, with a wide range of flowers, colours and finishes. That is not to say that they don’t also have good contemporary designs in stronger colours, but so do others. Since everything is made to order, custom sizes and details are possible.

Mechini H36 www.mechini.com

Mechini are the leading exponent of a Florentine tradition for chandeliers (and other items) made from painted metal combined with glass. The range of designs, colours and sizes is huge, plus they willingly do custom pieces. Since we have no longer had our showrooms, we have sold very few, so they clearly need to be seen – as you can do if you go to stand H36! You’ll like some more than others.

MEE Murano F45 www.meemurano.com

MEE’s is a fascinating collection of very contemporary, experimental Venetian glass designs. You’ll either love them or hate them – nothing could be further from the design language of many UK-based designers. But if you have a brave, flamboyant client, something from MEE Murano might be just the thing. Have a look.

Pallucco C33 www.pallucco.com

A very interesting collection from some top designers. This year, they have a LED version of the vast Fortuny flood light (that normally has a 500W incandescent lamp). It will be interesting to see how it performs. There will also be Arianna, an intriguing design of moveable cherry  wood rods, and Tape – a spot light shining down onto tape strung across a wheel. They look much better than these descriptions suggest, so you have to go look.

Torremato D36 www.torremato.com

We will be fascinated to see what Torremato introduce at the show! A young brand (an offshoot of the very different Il Fanale q.v.), they are going their own way, using wood and metal to create wonderful indoor and outdoor lights.

Venetia Studium (Fortuny) F30 www.venetiastudium.com

Venetia Studium has been one of our favourite makers since we began – fabulous Fortuny designs made from hand-painted silk, in Venice. If the patterned versions are too art nouveau for your project, then consider the plain versions.   Most designs are now available in glass, for environments where more light in needed, or where they risk being knocked about. They also make thrilling versions of the large Fortuny floodlight – the pieces may be big but they are engineered like jewels. Look out for the one with rich gold leaf inside the reflector – wonderful to look at and warming the light being cast.

Vistosi E23 F22 www.vistosi.it

Vistosi’s is probably the finest collection of contemporary glass lights. There are good designs for all sorts of applications, from simple pieces for a corridor, to designs created to be flexible so that specials can be mad; from designs ideal for cascades down stairwells, to Angelo Mangiarotti’s endlessly flexible Giogali system of glass hooks.

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Venetia Studium at Decorex

Fortuny Studio 1907 white Well, first Gubi bring out a white version of Greta Grossman's Grasshopper ( see here) and now Venetia Studium have brought out a white version of Fortuny's magnificent large flood light. They will be showing it on their stand (D142) at Decorex. We detect a trend here!

Some objects can be pretty well understood from pictures, but to "get" others, one has to experience them for oneself. This Fortuny design is a case in point. So, at Decorex, check out the quality of the detailing:

Venetia Studium Fortuny 1907 detail 1

Venetia Studium Fortuny 1907 detail 2

But first, you'll be struck by the size. Functionally, Fortuny designed these floodlights to create a large field of shadowless light (which they do). But the pieces themselves are a statement in their own right -- a wonderful sculpture...

Venetia Studium Fortuny 1907 gold...which some people reverse, to get the effect of the back of them (they still cast useful light reflected off the wall that they are now facing):

Venetia Studium Fortuny 1907 backYou can also get this floodlight on wheels now, which is easier to move around:

DF60ST Fortuny by Venetia Studium

Fortuny created several floodlights along these lines and another version is made by Pallucco. This is not a case of one company ripping the other off: both are licensed to produce it. Venetia Studium was created to re-edit Fortuny designs, the silk versions of which are ripped off -- and badly.

You can download the latest version of the brochure for the Fortuny "Studio 1907" here., and of their silk collection here.

Venetia Studium Fortuny Cesendello silk pendant light

 

 

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Information

Milan 2012

Produzione Privata table lightThis being an even-numbered year, there is no Euroluce attached to the Milan Furniture Fair (they have the kitchen show, EuroCucina, instead). The rules of the main Fair forbid lighting stands, so the only lights you'll see there are dressing furniture stands. On non-Euroluce years, the lighting community gathers in Frankfurt, for Light+Building (for which I have one of my fair guides half-written but, as a result of the death of my father, I may not be able to complete or issue it).

HOWEVER, there are lots of exciting lights being shown in Milan itself during the time of the Fair, both at the showrooms that Italian lighting makers have there, and in all sorts of other spaces. No interiors event has the buzz -- the parties! -- of Milan during the week of the Furniture Fair!

We are highlighting here some of the lighting destinations in Milan that you should not miss. There is no definitive list of who will be where, so I'll update this post if I hear of any other worthwhile destinations. But, as always, pick up the Interni guide when you arrive.

I am only too used to the expressions on the faces of Britons when I point out that, for over 100 years, the world's top designers and architects have been designing lights -- striving to create the most beautiful, the most fascinating, the most effective, sometimes the most challenging, pieces they can. Nevertheless, it is true, and the best place to experience this is in the Brera district of Milan, at Via Varese 15, where the studio of Michele de Lucchi is. Besides being one of the world's most illustrious architects, he is also a leading designer of lights.  His portfolio includes several designs for Artemide, including Tolomeo and LED net -- currently the most enquired about light in all the Architonic Virtual Showrooms.

But for a balanced, creative existence he has his "private production", Produzione Privata, that allows him contact with craftsmen and materials without the same level of commercial pressure.  This is run from the studio, which is where they stage their exhibition during the Salone del Mobile. The light at the head of this post is a new design being launched this year. I can't think of anything that works quite as this one will: an uplighter, but decorative -- the glass will also be lit by the edge of the cone of light. It is part of an exhibition called Sostare Penzolando (Standing and dangling).

So they are must-see. Who else is?

FontanaArte arguably still has the finest collection of 20th century designs of any lighting company but they have lost their way in recent years. So we are delighted that, strengthened by recent changes in ownership, they are announcing for Milan and Frankfurt that "something new is back!".

"FontanaArte takes part in the most important international lighting fair where it will show its new products and release a new edition of its historical products designed by those architects who have played key roles in the company’s success over 80 years of history."

So you should see mouth-watering additions to their collection of vintage lights, at the Casa degli Atellani, Corso Magenta, 65 and no doubt at their excellent showrooms (where the whole collection can be seen) at Via Santa Margherita 4.

Maybe the biggest splash will be made by the English! Tom Dixon is creating MOST at the Museo Nazionale della Scienza e della Tecnologia, Via Olona 6B, with our favourite design blog, dezeen, which is setting up their Design Studio "powered by Jambox". The space is being furnished by Tom Dixon to resemble Andy Warhol's Factory, and there will be lots of groovy stuff happening -- see also this post from dezeen. It will be a chance to see Tom Dixon's new Fin Light and Etch Web, about which we have posted recently. Delightfull will be there too -- see our recent Delightfull posts.

Venice's two greatest brands will, as always, be putting on spectacular shows. Barovier & Toso will be in the Orto Botanico di Brera, creating The Secret Garden with Paola Navone, Citco and Zaha Hadid.  Venini have not yet let on what they are going to do but, whatever it is, you won't want to miss their showroom at Via Monte Napoleone 9.

Not to be outdone, Baccarat is putting on an exhibition at the Palazzo Morando, Via Sant'Andrea 6.

Meanwhile, MGX and FOC will be showing more ground-breaking pieces made using rapid-prototyping technologies. MGX will show a trio of Algue.MGX lights by Xavier Lust [sic] as part of the Perspectives exhibition at the Triennale. Meanwhile, FOC will be at the Dream Factory in the Brera district -- Corso Garibaldi 117.

FOC Milan 2012The exhibited items that will have travelled furtherest will David Trubridge's, from New Zealand. Normally, David himself comes too, but not this year (he'll be in New York at the Wanted Design show, that is concurrent with ICFF). His absence is for a good reason, though; distribution in Europe has now been sorted out, CE-certified versions are becoming available, and more pieces are being shipped as kit sets. So do take this opportunity to see current favourites, plus some new suprises! Via Madonnina 12.

Talking of CE certification, we try to bring to your attention those very few north Amican lighting companies who do create international versions of their lights. This means that you can specify them knowing them to be safe and legal. So we are delighted to point you to Spazio Pontaccio (Via Pontaccio 8) where you will see pieces by the exciting young New York City-based Roll & Hill. There will be new designs by the company's founder, Jason Miller, as well as by the justifiably very fashionable Lindsey Adleman and Rich Brilliant Willing.

Do not forget the brand-specific lighting showrooms in Milan. Besides FontanaArte and Venini (referred to above):

Artemide Corso Monforte 19 and Via Manzoni 12

Flos Corso Monforte 9

Luceplan Corso Monforte 7

Also:

Catellani & Smith will be at the Casa della Luce, Via Ventura 5

Foscarini will be at Superstudiopiu'

Pallucco will be at Via Tortona 37 Block 2H.12-21

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Pallucco: Bolle floor light by Joe Colombo

Pallucco Bolle by Joe Colombo 1Pallucco are re-editing the Bolle floor light by Joe Colombo. It is 173cm high and equipped with two fluorescent tubes running up the centre, supplemented by a 100W halogen uplighter. Contrary to early announcements, the tubes are always dimmable, but the uplighter isn't. It comes in black or white:

Its appearance can be adjusted. Each hole is on a separate aluminium ring, each of which can be rotated and positioned at will.

Joe Colombo is one of the characters who most influenced design in the 1960s (and not just design -- he was also a painter, a sculptor, an architect...). These were exciting times -- technological advances, space exploration.... His particular fascination was with the habitat of the future, demonstrating his ideas using his own flat -- he moved four times in ten years.

Besides this light from Pallucco, we have Oluce to thank for keeping many of his iconic designs in production. They include this famous desk light:

Oluce colombo desk light by joe colombothis characteristic table light:

Oluce coupe table by joe colomboand one of the all-time best arco-type floor standing suspension lights:

Oluce Coupe 3320 set by Joe colombowith this beautiful head:

Oluce Coupe floor head by joe colombo

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