Quasar

Quasar at Sleep

As you know, because of the lack of opportunity to see contemporary fine lighting in London, we encourage brands to show at events here, particularly those designs and installations not easily understood from pictures alone. We are delighted, therefore, that Quasar is exhibiting at the Sleep Event at the BDC in Islington tomorrow and Wednesday. 

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Brands

Jan Pauwels' amazing feature lights for Quasar!

Quasar Universe Square chandelier

Is there a more unusual and eclectic collection of lights than Quasar’s? Have a look, at www.quasar.nl.

They have beautiful, flexible, delicate collections designed by Jan Pauwels. See some exciting custom installations on his own web site, at www.random.be.

He uses wires to make shapes, that also connect tiny, star-like lights:

Quasar Universe square detail

Glass pieces can be added. Here is Universe Square (above) with glass rods added:

Quasar Universe Square pendant light with glass rods added

The result is the lightest, airiest feature light possible – and not obstructing any view!

Quasar Universe Square chandelier in interior

They don’t have to be square. They can have a random shape, like this version of Universe:

Quasar Universe random over a table

They can be round, and have spotlights added to increase the amount of light being cast, as in this Universe Disc:

Quasar Universe chandelier round with spot lights

The wires can be curved, as in Curled:

Quasar Universe Curled chandelier

Nobilis is the shape of a traditional chandelier:

Quasar Nobilis chandelier

So is Mira, this time with crystal drops added – so it becomes a "real" chandelier, but the lightest ever!

Quasar Mira chandeler
Quasar Mira chandelier detail

Philae is a delicate leaf shape…

Quasar Philae chandelier

…that can be made up into compositions:

Quasar Philae chandeliers in a group installation

Because Quasar make everything themselves, in their own factory, they are more than happy to do custom arrangements. The world’s you lobster, really! So do get in touch with us if you are looking to add some delicate enchantment to your project.

Like this...

Quasar Universe chaotic lighting installation
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Brands

Quasar at Euroluce

Quasar is one of those brands that, because of the quality of what they do and their independent approach, is highly regarded by the industry.

Their eclectic collection includes some particularly successful designs by Jan PauwelsCitadel

…and  Universe Square, for example:

This year, you will be able to see a new Jan Pauwels design, Rosetta

…as well as new pieces by Maurizio Ferrari, Estefania Johnson, Sybille van Gammeren, and by Daniel Becker, who designed the go-anywhere (wall or ceiling), as-big-as-you-like, Sparks for Quasar:

See them in hall 11, stands B33-B39. As you can probably tell from the images above, these are amazing designs that you have to see for yourself: pictures don’t really do them justice.

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lightjunction: trend #3 -- modules that you can build up into compositions

vibia origami composition outdoors

lightjunction, our new fine lighting event, will be collocated with designjunction at the Sorting Office on New Oxford Street during London Design Week, 18-22 September 2013

A completely new type of light is creating exciting possibilities!

Each design is a module that, when connected to others, forms a spectacular installation that can cover wide areas.

You decide where they go, so the result is site-specific.

The leading source is Vibia, who are offering modules for use on walls and ceilings, indoors and out.

This is such an important development in decorative lighting that we have asked Vibia to give a half-hour training sessions on it at lightjunction.

To understand what is happening, let's look at their Origami -- the light featured in the image above.

There are just two shapes...

Vibia Origami wall light shapes

...out of which you can make compositions on a wall and/or ceiling. They connect together electrically, so you only need one power supply. Origami can be used inside or out-of-doors.

That's it really, because the rest is up to you!

Here are some arrangements that others have done:

Vibia origami wall light composition

vibia origami wall light composition exterior

vibia origami wall light composition

And here is a a video that briefly shows how it is done:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=-Tbvj2MyqtI

The video introduces you to Vibia's Create Your Project (CREA), a free, easy-to-use software tool that becomes more exciting the more you get to know it. We'll cover it more fully in another post but, for now, understand that Vibia were responding to the fact that, whilst the possibilities of these compositions are huge, we are all likely to need a bit of help composing them!

We want to play about with different configurations, then, when we are happy with our design, our clients need to see what we have done, so that they can approve it.

Therefore, CREA produces a 3D simulation, which can show much more than just the Vibia composition. This is why it becomes such a useful tool. You can produce professional-quality 3D visualizations of your proposals without having to involve anybody else!

It also produces a installation manual specific to your composition.

If CREA helps if you are using Origami, it is essential if you want to make up something magical using Vibia's  Match!  This module could not be used if it were not for CREA.

It starts simply enough:

vibia match pendant light composition

but pretty quickly it grows into this:

vibia match pendant light composition

The way CREA works for Match is that you tell it what area you want lit. It then works out where the light bodies need to be, and presents you with a variety of suitable arrangements from which you choose. It is certainly worth it for results like these:

vibia match pendant light installation

vibia match pendant light installation

Here's another helpful little video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=4zpZtOLHPsY

Match is just one of Vibia's pendant-type modules. Others are Ameba, Halo Circular, Halo Lineal and Rhythm. For the ceiling, there are Link XXL and Link. For the wall, besides Origami, there is Fold Build-in, Fold Surface, Link and Puck Wall Art. You can find them all here.

Now, you're probably saying to yourself, that's all very well and good. Clearly Vibia are committed to this exciting new concept. But does that make it a trend?

Well, it wouldn't if only Vibia were doing it, but they are not.

We see the first example as being Foscarini's Fields of 2007:

Foscarini wall light Fields_White

Then, much more recently, Axo Light's Shatter:

axolight-lightecture-shatter ceiling lights

Flos Wall Piercing:

Flos Wall PiercingQuasar's Sparks:

Quasar Sparks system in a hall

and Luceplan's Synapse:

Luceplan Synapse installation

What do you say now, eh? Convinced?!

Training session at lightjunction 2013

As we said at the top of this post, this is such an important development in decorative lighting, and CREA is such a powerful, yet easy-to-use, tool, that we have asked Vibia to give a half-hour training session at lightjunction each day (except Sunday). So, whichever day you come, you'll be able to attend it.

lightjunction 18 22 September 2013

 

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Milan 2013: Quasar go from strength to strength

Quasar stand at Euroluce 2013 1 c 560 Quasar don't really need to change to meet the new economic environment. They have their own way of doing things and they regularly launch designs that most other manufacturers would regard as too risky.

In the end, though, it is about making lights so beautiful, so stunning that they are irresistible -- no-one thinks about how they got there.  Unfortunately, many of the world's most spectacular lights do not always photograph well, so above is an amateur picture taken of Quasar's stand at Euroluce, dominated by the two Universe Squares with glass rods, that drew people onto the stand as soon as they caught sight of it -- resistance was futile. Here they are from a different angle:

Quasar stand at Euroluce 2013 2 c 560

You see that person on the left gazing up at it? He is doing this because it is as fascinating close up -- beautiful, but also a puzzle: how exactly does it do what it does...? Cleverly, is this answer -- this is one of a series by Jan Pauwels, who can do clever things.

For example, he realized that the Universe Square is big (100cm x 1000cm) but that people in humble dwellings might like their own Universe. So Orion was launched at Euroluce:

Quasar Orion chandelier Jan Pauwels

It is only 175x30x30cm so it would go over a rectangular table. Recognizing that merely scaling down would not provide such an interesting object, Orion is not symmetrical -- some of its dimensions seem to have greater energy than others. It would make a good starship. Again, good pictures are difficult to find, but here it is on the Quasar stand anyway, partly reflected in a mirror:

Quasar Orion pendant light at Euroluce 560

This is M-Light, designed by the silversmiths,  Rob and Jaap Thalen:

Quasar M light pendant light 560

It is a fascinating object -- seemingly a simple ball made up of repeated identical shapes, but the pattern is not consistent -- you can see above the gashes that periodically puncture the surface. This one is Ø45cm -- or it could be M-light D.150, which is identical except that it is Ø150cm. There is also another colourway:

Quasar M Light pendant light red

This next light, Spica was notable not so much for itself as for the LEDs in it, that have a CRI of 95! Yes, 95!! Spica is quite large, so it evenly the surface of the table under it, towards which people were unconsciously drawn. It was always occupied, so this picture was taken when the fair was not open:

Quasar Spica at Euroluce 2013 560

Spica comes in white or black and is Ø120cm:

Quasar Spica pendant light set

Finally, Sparks.

Quasar sparks system on a wall

I have already posted about this light here. Suffice it to say now, therefore, that Euroluce gave us a chance to have a really good discussion about Sparks, with its designer, Daniel Becker, whilst standing in front of a largish Sparks installation. Not only did he turn out to be a really nice guy, but I also now know a lot more about how this modular system works. So when you are ready to specify one, give us a call.

 

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