chandelier

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Installations created using Diadema from Vistosi

Vistosi Diadema chandedlier at Le Tre Gazzelle Milan

Diadema is one of a series of designs from the great Venetian glass company, Vistosi, intended to be used in a wide variety of ways – both as standard catalogue items (chandeliers, pendant lights, floor lights, wall lights) and for custom pieces.

It consists of glass rods, as above at Le Tre Gazelle in Milan, where they are forming the spectacular chandelier, as well as the simpler wall lights.

Diadema can be made into simple pendants, like these, for Bulgari in Paris:

Vistosi Diadema custom pendants Bulgari Paris

Though more often, the rods are of different lengths, as here, in these suspensions over a bar at the Hotel Dorint in Zurich...

Vistosi Diadema suspension lights Hotel Dorint Zurich

...which match the Diadema wall lights there:

Vistosi Diadema Hotel Dorint Zurich appliques wall lights

Back to a larger scale, here's a Diadema chandelier at the Hotel Regina Baglioni in Rome:

Vistosi Diadema chandelier at the Regina Baglioni Rome

The effect is quieter when two colours are used:

Vistosi - Diadema - Double colour

The standard glass colours are clear and topaz (as above). But blue can look very cool – in both senses! – for example.

Vistosi Diadema suspension light blue

The images in this post have been taken from the book Vistosi have just published that shows details of some of their installations. You can download a PDF of it here.

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Brands

Installations created using Giogali from Vistosi

Viastosi Giogali chandelier Doha airport

That chandelier (at Doha airport) is seven metres high and contains 17,500 of these:

Vistosi Giogali gancio

This is Vistosi's Giogali system, of course – the system of glass hooks dreamt up by Angelo Mangiarotti in 1967 to make possible glass compositions that are just glass, having no metal except the slender frame from which they hang.

The shape that the resulting piece takes depends solely upon the shape of that frame. Each gancio (hook) hangs from the one above. The maximum length is 2.5m, so longer compositions are formed by having layers, like the Doha piece above, or this, in a Boffi showroom in Milan:

Vistosi Giogali chandelier in Boffi Milan showroom

Giogali can be used to create great curtains of glass, as here at a Bulgari showroom in Taipei:

Vistosi Giogali curtains Bulgari Taipei

Being only glass hooks, the resulting composition is light, airy – not heavy or dense.

The pieces above use the original design of hooks, that hang directly underneath each other. There are two sizes (Giogali and Minigiogali), and a choice of colours: clear, white, black, chrome, gold or bronze, or a custom colour of your choice.

In 2005, Angelo Mangiarotti created the 3D version, whose hooks can connect horizontally, making possible drama such as this for Bulgari in Paris:

Vistosi Giogali 3D Bulgari Paris

Close up, the 3D hooks look like this:

Vistosi Giogali 3D detail

Here, at Bulgari London, is a smaller composition, making use of the way the 3D hooks connect together, allowing a loop made only of glass:

Vistosi Giogali 3D Bulgari London

Now, you will have seen fake Giogali. Besides being theft of intellectual property, they only look like the real thing! They don't perform in the same way: what has made the Giogali such a success is the quality of the glass rings, each one handmade in Venice. One way of telling the difference is to see how wonderfully Vistosi's hooks play with light. The result is magical, even when only lit by daylight, as here in the Toronto Four Seasons:

Vistosi Giogali chandelier Four Seasons Toronto

Actually, you'll have to take my word for the it: glass is notoriously difficult to photograph....

The images in this post have been taken from the book Vistosi have just published that shows images of some of their installations. You can download a PDF of it here.

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Practical

Murano glass chandeliers: tutorial #1

Seguso murano glass Coloniale 6 light chandelier detail

We casually say that Murano glass chandeliers can come in a variety of sizes and shapes. But we don’t necessarily explain what that means – what is possible and what is not.

So this post illustrates what is possible.

My example is Coloniale from Seguso, partly because Seguso Vetri d’Arte is one of the most illustrious of all Murano brands, and partly because it is a design that particularly suits our market. (In other words, I think that you will like it!)

Here is a round six light chandelier version of Coloniale:

Seguso Coloniale 6 light Murano glass chandelier

A twelve light:

Seguso Coloniale 12 light amber Murano glass chandelier

An eighteen light: (See that as the number of lights increases, they start being arranged in tiers.)

Seguso Vetri d'Arte Coloniale 18 light Murano glass chandelier

And a  twenty-four light:

Seguso Vetri d'Arte Coloniale 24 light Murano glass chandelier

The key point is that they are modular – a kit of standard parts that, like Lego, can be made up into different designs. In this case, there are three lengths of arm, and three units making up the stem. One of these is long and used on its own in the six light chandelier, the next is ball-shaped and added to make a longer stem in the twelve light. The third is concave. It is added above the bowl of the twelve light, partly to add length and partly to finesse the transition between the ball-shaped unit and the bowl. This shape also goes between the additional bowls in the eighteen and twenty four light.

In other words, the components are specific sizes, so you can’t have a chandelier that is the same shape but – say – 10% bigger. (In fact, you can – Murano chandeliers are made to order by the most highly skilled craftsmen, but non-standard components will cost a lot more.)

On the other hand, the modules can be made up into other things. There are always matching wall lights! This is a Coloniale two light applique:

Seguso Verti d'Arte Coloniale Murano glass applique 2 light plus blue shades

And sometimes there is also a five light wall light (in two tiers – two above, three below).

Seguso also offer table lights in this family. Here is one…

Seguso Coloniale Murano glass table light tall

…plus a floor light…

Seguso Vetri d'Arte Coloniale Murano glass floor light

…and even an elegant side table!

Seguso Coloniale Murano glass side table

You can see that the last three are constructed from the components that make up the stem of the chandelier.

Do get in touch with me if you’d like more info about Coloniale or Murano chandeliers in general.

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Brands

Leading architect creates an important new design for Bover

Dome pendant light by Tagliabue for Bover

This is Dome, a new introduction from Bover in Barcelona. It was designed for them by Benedetta Tagliabue. Though Italian, she founded the studio EMBT in Barcelona with Enric Miralles, whom she later married.

Benedetta Tagliabue

© Paolo Fassini

EMBT’s portfolio ranges from office towers to public spaces via industrial design. They designed the Scottish Parliament building, during the construction of which Miralles died, so Benedetta Tagliabue completed it in sole control.

Highly regarded by the profession, she won the RIBA Sterling prize in 2005, is a member of the Pritzker Architecture Prize jury, and received the 2013 RIBA Jenks Award for her major contribution to both the theory and practice of architecture internationally. She is a visiting professor at Harvard and Columbia Universities, and at Barcelona ETSAB.

So what does such an eminent architect, used to working on a large scale, do when she designs a light fitting?

Dome comes in two sizes. The one in the image above is Ø90cm, and there is another one, double the size, at Ø180cm:

Dome 180 chandelier by Benedetta Tagliabue for Bover

The wooden structure is lit from above, from a housing that can be black (as above) or white.

This leaves the dome free to interact with the light around it, whatever its source. Instead of being a luminaire with a light inside it, Dome becomes an illuminated sculpture. Its deep ribs, and the gaps between them (that are sometimes empty, sometimes filled with a delicate translucent material), allow for the play of light and shadow as time passes, and as we move around it. The structure is unashamedly architectural, with its load-bearing ribs that not only create a cupola, but also continue on up to form a smaller inverted dome above. Part of the pleasure comes from appreciating its mathematical, geometric characteristics and the patterns that they create.

Dome suspension light by Benedetta Tagliabue for Bover

The final result was reached after making many models, and comprises 170 big and small wooden sections that are intertwined and sewn together by hand at Bover’s factory outside Barcelona.

It has a fantastic presence…

Dome pendant light Bover
Dome wooden chandelier Bover

…and clearly draws on Benedetta Tagliabue’s architectural thinking. For example, the Scottish Parliament building:

Scottish parliament interior

And the COPAGRI pavilion for the Milan Expo:

EMBT Copagri dome for expo milano by bendetta Tagliabue

Finally, do watch this joyous video of two amazing people at the top of their game, Benedetta Tagliabue and Joana Bover, chatting – and demonstrating the “feminine empathy” that lies behind the creation of Dome!

https://vimeo.com/142235655

Bover wooden chandelier Dome
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Brands

Jan Pauwels' amazing feature lights for Quasar!

Quasar Universe Square chandelier

Is there a more unusual and eclectic collection of lights than Quasar’s? Have a look, at www.quasar.nl.

They have beautiful, flexible, delicate collections designed by Jan Pauwels. See some exciting custom installations on his own web site, at www.random.be.

He uses wires to make shapes, that also connect tiny, star-like lights:

Quasar Universe square detail

Glass pieces can be added. Here is Universe Square (above) with glass rods added:

Quasar Universe Square pendant light with glass rods added

The result is the lightest, airiest feature light possible – and not obstructing any view!

Quasar Universe Square chandelier in interior

They don’t have to be square. They can have a random shape, like this version of Universe:

Quasar Universe random over a table

They can be round, and have spotlights added to increase the amount of light being cast, as in this Universe Disc:

Quasar Universe chandelier round with spot lights

The wires can be curved, as in Curled:

Quasar Universe Curled chandelier

Nobilis is the shape of a traditional chandelier:

Quasar Nobilis chandelier

So is Mira, this time with crystal drops added – so it becomes a "real" chandelier, but the lightest ever!

Quasar Mira chandeler
Quasar Mira chandelier detail

Philae is a delicate leaf shape…

Quasar Philae chandelier

…that can be made up into compositions:

Quasar Philae chandeliers in a group installation

Because Quasar make everything themselves, in their own factory, they are more than happy to do custom arrangements. The world’s you lobster, really! So do get in touch with us if you are looking to add some delicate enchantment to your project.

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Quasar Universe chaotic lighting installation
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